<= 2004.06.06

2004.06.08 =>

oremos por guatemala

Uncle Z, who is old enough to remember Reagan as something other than a good-natured amnesiac in California, sez:

Pablo, as President, Reagan was a hell of an actor. He was exactly the type of plastic facade the US needed in 1980. Pessimistic uncertainty coupled with malaise would be the best way to describe the '70s. Suffice it to say that Reagan paved the way for spokesmodels. With Nancy feeding him lines, his oratorical delivery was sublime and was simply a symbol representing the American Dream of hope and prosperity at the expense of substantial debt. Conversely, Carter was very realistic and depressing, yet he has been a saint with his post-presidency magnanimous endeavours. Supply-side economics aka "Reaganomics", "Voodoo Economics" is great for Republican business owners under the guise of trickle-down economics.

I have been watching Christian television. "What?" I hear you say, "that's impossible—you don't have a television!" Indeed. This weekend I found myself having to write about a Pentecostal church service in Guatemala, which is not the sort of thing I thought to attend when I was there, so I called up Marlowe, who is my man when it comes to the Christians. He pointed out that tbn.org has 24-hour streaming video of evangelist services, so I watched some of those, then hit upon enlace.org, the Spanish-language version. So far I've seen "Para tí Mujer," which is a Jesus-for-women talk show, and, more to the point, "Pentecostés Hoy," in which Apóstol Raúl Vargas preaches live from San José, Costa Rica. Apparently if you're affiliated with the Assembly of God you get to call yourself an apostle after a while. At least in Central America.

But curse you, push media, I have to wait two whole days to watch "Jesus Es Señor," hosted by Harold Caballeros in Guatemala City. Sr. Caballeros runs El Shaddai, whose stated purpose is to write Guatemala into the list of nations that shall be saved as written in Revelation 21:24.

 

<= 2004.06.06

2004.06.08 =>

up (2004.06)

The Warm South
The Roof Rat Review